This was sent to me by a friend who does rescue also. Just wondering if anyone else has heard about this?




From: CABRAZ@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 12:54 PM
Subject: [CABRAZ] Fw: INFO REGARDING PARVO AND NEW STRAIN FOUND IN ADULT
DOGS - PARVO 2C - OT

A PUPPY WAS TRANSPORTED THIS WEEKEND AND SUCCUMBED TO PARVO YESTERDAY.
THIS IS INFO SENT BY THE GROUP WHO RAN THE TRANSPORT. VALUABLE TO BOTH
RESCUES AND DRIVERS. ALSO, PLEASE SHARE WITH THE SHELTERS WITH WHOM YOU
MIGHT WORK.

One of the ACO's on a board I'm on actually went to a lecture on 2c Parvo
in NJ not too long ago. This is what she said:
There
is a new strain out there that is attacking older dogs!!! They had one
test positive for the new strain in NJ according to the lecture from
last night.
So, it is in the state. It has been located in 2/3rds of
the States in the US . The worse part is that the test kits sometimes
test negative and it is the new strain of parvo!! They are calling the
new strain 2c; the one that they had before (and still exists) 2b. The
new strain is not the typical bloody type; it can be yellow diarrhea
and still be parvo. The samples to send to a lab., if you
are going to is the small intestines and the tongue....It seems to make
lesions in the tongue.
The treatment is the same as the old strain, it is just harder to detect.
As
far as the lower living standards, the first ones to report the strain
were professional breeders that saw their puppies and the puppies'
mothers dying from a disease that did not look like parvo but was wiping
out their dogs. They called a virologist to the scene since they were
losing a lot of money; the test came back parvo but with a mutant in
the genome. This is what they are calling 2c. By the way, they are
seeing this in raccoons as well.
Parvo is not self-limiting. It
kills anything that gets it unless there is medical intervention to
save the life of the animal. The first place that I worked as a vet.
tech., we saw several cases of parvo, mostly coming from the
poorer
communities that could not afford to vaccinate. The first summer that I
came back to work as the vet., I saw 20
cases. I managed to save 16 of those 20 because I was so familiar with
parvo that I could detect it without the test kits. Now, the
suggestion is to not even test; "If it looks like parvo, treat
for parvo until proven that it is not parvo," as the lecturer said.
I
just started writing for Examiner.com. Since this was an interesting
lecture, I might be commenting further on one of my articles in the
future. I'm going to see if I can get the lecturer to send me some of
his information to post, or at least some decent pictures, etc. to
write the article about what I found out.
Rhonda wrote: Thank you,
Anne, for this valuable information. Everyone, please note that this
strain of parvo WILL infect adult dogs. We've been seeing more and more
of it in the shelters in KY. I, personally, pulled 2 adult dogs who
were infected and died while awaiting transport -- within 24 hours of
showing any
symptoms, and despite aggressive treatment.

Please
remember, also, that almost all of the dogs on our transports have
been vaccinated within days of transport; and because the vaccines may
take 5-7 days to be fully effective, most of the dogs may have little
or no immunity during transport. Some may have been vaccinated at some
point in their life or may have developed some natural immunity, but
that's not something you can count on, when it comes to parvo.
For
those of you who transported Macaroni uncrated in your vehicles, your
upholstery is likely now contaminated too, and you will at least need to
cover it with a nonporous material for any future transports. If
you're able to clean it with bleach solution, you should do that, as
well. And, if possible, it would be a good idea to crate any dogs you
transport to keep them from coming
into contact with any
contaminated area, if Macaroni was uncrated in your vehicle. It's
always best to crate puppies and not put them on the ground at stops,
so as to try to contain any potential contamination. And please remember
too that a dog does not have to exhibit symptoms to be a parvo
carrier. All it takes is some parvo-infected poop on a dog's paw to
enable them to spread it to others. The dog that is the carrier may
never become infected, but she still has the ability to spread the
disease.
Please watch for early signs of parvo -- lethargy, lack
of appetite and vomiting (usually frothy/phlegm). These symptoms will
usually appear long before the diarrhea begins. For the most common
strain of parvo, treatment in the early stages is 85% effective. It is,
hoever, a different story with the strain that
infected Macaroni.
While standard parvo treatment is rarely successful on this
strain, we can at least attempt to control any further infection. I
applaude those of you who took quick action on Saturday to try to help
Macaroni and the other dogs on the transport. The other dogs from
transport should be closely
monitored for the next week or so, especially if they were recently
vaccinated.
For
those of you who don't know me, Toni and I have been teaming up each
week to get dogs out of KY and to their rescues. I usually get them to
Grove City , and she takes them east from there. I've copied all of my
drivers and rescues from this past weekend on this email too. Some may
have seen Macaroni, the little pyr pup from Mt. Sterling KY , in Grove
City on Saturday. We are currently scouting out new meeting places for
the Grove City stop, so please take note of the location if you are
driving any legs in or out of Grove City , from this point forward.
Thank you all for your
dedication and compassion for all of the dogs we transport and for
doing your very best to keep them all safe, as you send them on their
way to their new lives.
-- Rhonda