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View Full Version : a couple questions for you all with ACDs



Bluerules
08-01-2009, 12:33 AM
So what do you think is the BEST tool for removing the loose hair on your ACDs.. mine are shedding like mad dogs and Im finding that the furminator is unbelievable!! it takes off so much hair. Is there any pros and cons to this tool you have noticed? it's so sharp and rough and I ran it over my hand on accident once.. ouch lol but I was wondering maybe there's something even better?
Second question.. raised food bowls. do you use them? I use them for Sandy, Oscar and Lily and I have always heard that they are good in preventing bloat.. but then I read on one website that a rasied food bowl can cause bloat.. does anybody know the truth do any of you use raised food bowls? has anyone heard of an ACD getting bloat? I worry alot about it because Lily (pitbull) Oscar and Sydney (ACDS) eat so fast..
and there was one more question I wanted to ask you smart folks but of course I cannot remember right now.. so I will leave you with a pic of my pretty and stay tuned for maybe another question that might be able to stump you wise ACD luvers:)

http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs165.snc1/6172_132493825449_632720449_3705668_845480_n.jpg

Miss Marlie
08-01-2009, 12:56 AM
The brush I use is a pin brush and wide tooth comb however when I had to take Kate in to the vets to have a foxtail removed from her nose. The vet tried the furmintor and it worked really well. Feeding I use metal bowls on the ground. I thought that bloat happened in the larger breeds. I've never heard of a ACD getting bloat.

Marlynn and my girls Kate and Lola :D

nschiro
08-01-2009, 12:59 AM
I personally like a shedding loop. It pulls out the undercoat without creating static or pulling their hair. Even my shep x didn't mind it. The furminator is great but it is essentially a no. 9 (?) blade so you want to be sure to use it evenly all over their body - not one area or it can bald.

My dogs have always eaten with elevated food dishes - they eat on the step up from our family room to the kitchen. It really helped my shep x when she got older and arthritic. Pawsom sometimes eats on the floor. She doesn't have a preference. She's only 30 lbs so I am not too worried about bloat. I just make sure that she doesn't do any strenuous activity before or after eating and she also eats The Honest Kitchen - a wet re-hydrated food so no worry about food expansion in her tummy.

Nicole

RickAKAFishslayer
08-01-2009, 01:08 AM
I use a plain old plastic human comb. It works well, fits my pocket and most importantly, Dingo seems to enjoy the feel and lets me comb away.

Bowls on the floor for all our dogs. Never a problem.

Lucy was a food inhaler. I used it to my advantage by using mealtime as a training session with her kibble as rewards, a few pieces at a time.

Rick:paw:

Linda Watkins
08-01-2009, 01:09 AM
I think the best way to deal with the fur is a clipper :lol:

As to bloat -- if they're eating fast, is there any possibility of putting their food into a Buster Cube or kong type toy so they have to work at getting it out & take their time eating?

3blues
08-01-2009, 01:28 AM
I've thought about raised food bowls too, we feed on the floor. But I heard about it causing bloat so haven't bought one yet.

I bought a shedding comb for the pups which I need to dig out & use. Thanks for reminding me Bluerules. :lol: I almost forgot about it. I saw our vet use it on one of our guys & thought it magical the way it pulled hair off. :D

mom22acds
08-01-2009, 07:21 AM
I use the Furminator. Well, maybe I should say I have a Furminator. I don't use it nearly as often as I should. The tumbleweeds around my baseboards are a never-ending battle. However, when I do use it, I find it to be quite effective. Bought it off eBay a while ago.

Mine have always eaten out of raised bowls. Two eat super-fast and two eat slowly. Never had a problem with bloat.

Off to get my Furminator now...

Nevada001
08-01-2009, 08:42 AM
I use the furminator on all but Edi. One of the ladies in my class is a groomer and said you should never use it on a show coat. O.OIt really works well on my old girl. She gets such a heavy coat probably due to her age. I am very careful not to press hard but just use light steady pressure from her neck down the back. My cats love it as well because when one of the dogs are up on the table they jump up to get some special treatment. Very light pressure for the cats as well.

Bowls are metal on the floor. Each have their own water and food dish with the stands to keep them from moving all over.

Jean & Crew

2speckledblue
08-01-2009, 09:02 AM
I use a furminator and it works great. I make sure I'm gentle with it since it does have that blade. I hide it from my husband since he has no patience with a dog moving when he's using a regular dog comb. Dublin shed in the spring. Dusty is shedding right now. Roo gets a few runs over his coat with it because although his coat is thin and doesn't really shed, he thinks the others are getting something special that he isn't. Silly boy!

I used a raised dog bowl with my Saint which is a breed very subject to bloat. He never had any problem. I made sure before feeding him that he had not just exercised. With my foster, Dublin, who has more of a barrel chest, I do the same about the cool down after exercise just in case. His bowl is on the floor tho.

Ringtailroxy
08-01-2009, 09:27 AM
i was working in a clinic when the Furminator first came out...i took a small one home to try. i was hooked when i removed enough hair to glue together a whole acd!

i used the Shed'N'Blade for years before the Furminator. it was satisfactory, & to that point, I found it the best tool to use on a WET dog.

but the Furminator is King in our house! I have 2 sizes, a large Yellow one for the dog, & a smaller blue one for my kitties. My girlfriend has a ginormous one for her horse!

as for elevated dog bowls, I always recommend elevating dog bowls to the appropriate height for a dog. if the dog has to lower it's head all the way down to eat kibble, there is a likelihood of swallowing more air while they gulp their food. remember-dogs rarely chew kibble, they just swallow. if feeding RAW diets, then it's best to feed on the ground, so they lie down to eat, because they chew their bones.

rtr

littleroads
08-01-2009, 09:40 AM
First of all, I have to say that I LOVE Sandy's pictures! She is beautiful. :)

I use the Furminator.

I use raised bowls for my older dog with arthritis.

I use a Brake-Fast bowl or Eat Slower bowl for Allen, who inhales his food.

Karen Miller
08-01-2009, 10:04 AM
This link (you may need to cut and paste it into your browser) is to an AVMA published article regarding non-dietary risk factors for bloat, which includes risk factors on the use of raised food bowls.:

http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.2000.217.1492?prevSearch=allfield%3A%28bloat +risk%29&searchHistoryKey=

Karen

2speckledblue
08-01-2009, 10:10 AM
Interesting about the article on raised bowls. Roo uses a brake fast bowl since he gulps food otherwise.

jrmgreer
08-01-2009, 01:38 PM
I found a rubber brush at petsmart... it works GREAT on my dogs when they are wet... Works fine dry too - but really pulls out the dead hair when they just had a bath...

Bluerules
08-01-2009, 01:55 PM
thanks everybody I really enjoying having you guys input. and that article is very intresting because I have read all my life in books etc that your suppose to have a rasied food bowl to PREVENT bloat.. im so confused lol

Ringtailroxy
08-01-2009, 03:07 PM
please try to remember:

medicine isn't always an exact science.

we are always learning new things. new insights, new connections, new solutions, new problems.

and the most amazing thing of all? it's all based on so many variables, it's difficult to fully comprehend the outcome of any medical decision!

my greatest lesson of the past 13 years of being an OTJ tech...

"nothing is routine"

my greatest lesson of 2 years of Vet Tech school...

"you are not only responsible for what you do, but also what you do not do"

rtr:angel:

p.s. that article/study on the raised bowls was specifically for large to giant breeds and is almost 9 years old...i'm not even allowed to use any medical references for my reports or essays that is older than 5 years!

"Factors significantly associated with an increased risk of GDV were increasing age, having a first-degree relative with a history of GDV, having a faster speed of eating, and having a raised feeding bowl. Approximately 20 and 52% of cases of GDV among the large breed and giant breed dogs, respectively, were attributed to having a raised feed bowl."

what about ages of the dogs? where the obese? underweight? how often where they fed? what was their activity post-postprandial? what where they fed? (dry vs. can vs. raw?) what where their activities prior to feeding? where their other dogs in the house to stimulate food protective behaviors? (ie. scarfing food?) so many variables...

TexasCDLorenz
08-01-2009, 03:49 PM
I use a plain old flea comb.
As for feeding- my dogs always eat in their crates, so they are laying down when they eat, then they nap for about 90 mins after. As I have had many more Rottweilers than ACDs, and they are prone to bloat, I'm very careful.
By feeding in their crates, no one eats fast- I NEVER take their food away, unless it is still there after 90mins. I feed 2 small meals a day. They eat them both laying down. Only 1 case of bloat in my entire life- female Rottie got into some bird protein pellets when I wasn't home. She ate the whole 20lb bag and then ran and played. She almost died, but had surgery and recovered! Took my credit card a long time to recover though!
I have seen mixed breed dogs in my vets office suffering from bloat- some of these dogs were ACD mixes ( looking much like my own dogs) I wouldn't take any chances- just because ACDs are not prone to bloat, does not mean it can't happen.

Doug in Alaska
08-02-2009, 12:17 AM
Furminator for me, these things are awesome!

Bluerules
08-03-2009, 12:43 AM
but the Furminator is King in our house! I have 2 sizes, a large Yellow one for the dog, & a smaller blue one for my kitties. My girlfriend has a ginormous one for her horse!



rtr
I have a large yellow one a small blue one too! :D

Im so worried about bloat happening to my dogs O.O

Thanks ALOT for all your input now im wondering if it's ok if I still feed on a rasied bowl

autiger23
08-03-2009, 05:34 PM
I use the brakefast bowl for Scout, too. It slows her down a lot. I worried more about her choking than getting bloat and the small brakefast bowl worked great. She now eats at the same speed as Buck who is a nice slow eater.


By feeding in their crates, no one eats fast- I NEVER take their food away, unless it is still there after 90mins.

Scout has eaten in her crate since I got her with no fear of losing the food- I think some dogs just eat fast because they can. She never even tries to go for Buck's food if she gets done first and is allowed out of the crate (that just happened recently)- she just inhales her food.

Jan and John at Chevland
08-03-2009, 07:44 PM
I just use a comb with rotating teeth and a small brush at times. The weather doesn't get that cold in Nth Qld, so I find I'm not having to deal with the beautiful thick coats the southern dogs tend to get.

I always feed on the ground. I don't have problems with dogs inhaling their food, because i feed all raw.

Bluerules
08-03-2009, 09:31 PM
I figured out that other question I wanted to ask but it's a gross one lol what do you if your dog has some sudden runny poop on a walk?? ew I know but it happens how do you even try to pick it up with a bag?? and when people are watching like at a dog park.. how awful

mlanger
08-03-2009, 09:44 PM
You fake it. put the bag over your hand and make an attempt to pick it up. Then just stroll off :fisch: What else can you do.

Bluerules
08-04-2009, 12:15 AM
You fake it. put the bag over your hand and make an attempt to pick it up. Then just stroll off :fisch: What else can you do.
:lol: awesome :doh:

YogiBear
08-05-2009, 02:33 PM
We have raised bowls. I didnt know until now it could cause bloat. We did it because we heard it is easier on a dogs back/neck to eat at an elevated normal head level. However, that said we mix dry food w/ wet canned food w/ a little water if needed for more moisture. We did it on our own, however, our dog trainer recommends mixing food to help prevent bloat. That said, if it is of real concern to you you can buy dog bowls with bumps in the bottom to make dogs eat slower thus avoiding bloat even more. Most dog stores or online suppliers have them. Mrs YB

lucystrauss
08-05-2009, 02:45 PM
I'm a little slow in replying to this one, but I use a shedding blade like this:
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=3307+5+56+786&pcatid=786

It's inexpensive and does a good job of taking out the undercoat without scratching the dog's skin.

Lucy also eats from raised bowls, but this is more because we had them leftover from when we had our labs - they were pigs and ate their meals in about 30 seconds. Lucy picks away at her food, so I highly doubt that she has any danger of getting bloat!

We'll see how her eating habits change when we have a puppy in the house later this year!! :)

ps - Sandy is gorgeous! She looks so wise ;)

Bluerules
08-05-2009, 07:13 PM
Aww thanks Sandy is wise. I heart her so much. I also use the shedding blade.. I sometimes will switch back n fourth from the shedding blade to the furminater

katldog
08-09-2009, 11:11 PM
My dogs all eat in their crates, no raised bowls BUT they all get water added to their food as it keeps them from sucking up the food instead of eating it!!

As to grooming -- I have several items I use as not all my dogs have the same coats. The furminator and the loop blade are both nice BUT do remember they are blades. Both can easily cut the top layer of coat off (thus removing their protection for rain and sun) and you can cut the dog with these too. Heck I have cut/nicked my own hand several times.

For normal every week or so grooming, I normally use a big wide tooth metal comb to start -- using on the parts of the dog where coat is not so thick --only on sides, legs, topline and chest... ie, not on neck, pants, and some parts of the thighs. I use a long tooth dematting rake for the heavier parts..the ends of the teeth are rounded and do not hurt the dogs skin.

I personally only use the Furminator when they start blowing coat. But for me I first give them a bath in warm water and then towel dry as best I can and then I have a dryer (non heat) to blow lots of the coat off before I even begin to brush it. I like a good boar's hair brush best, nothing like those horrid slicker brushes. Egads a sadist must have invented them..ever run those over your head?? your underarm where the skin is soft?? Stay away from them - the dogs hate them too O.O

While my dogs generally shed some all year long (forced air heat in my house) the twice a year blow is enough to make me want to move out!! It ain't nice for asthma or COPD. Except for shows this is the only time I bath my dogs. If the smell bad there are 2 items in home that I use...I mix Listerine half and half with water andf spritz the coat. ANother neat item is Avon's Skin So Soft -- spritz that on a dogs coat and they not only smell good, the coat will gleam and both of these help to deter fleas and mosquitos plus other little flying buggers!!

Now I am tired of just hinking of having to do dogs coats in a month or so, it takes long enough to do every dogs nails twice a month!! No hard pack dirt to wear nails down on my property :(

Lynda

2speckledblue
08-10-2009, 09:13 AM
I use a long tooth dematting rake for the heavier parts..the ends of the teeth are rounded and do not hurt the dogs skin.
Lynda

Do you have a link to a picture of the rake? I like the idea of not hurting the dog's skin in the thicker areas.

Bluerules
08-10-2009, 07:30 PM
hehehe at the goo poo. thanks everybody for your anwers. I used to always use a slicker brush when I was younger on my dogs but I dont touch them any more

TexasCDLorenz
08-11-2009, 12:54 PM
I use the slicker on some dogs- like my Opie that has a very thick coat. I use it on the thickest parts, around his neck and on the back of his hind legs. He has such thick hair on his back side, the boy could sit on a tack and never feel it. On the more sensitive parts, I use a regular brush or a flea comb.

katldog
08-11-2009, 01:23 PM
Do you have a link to a picture of the rake? I like the idea of not hurting the dog's skin in the thicker areas.

This is what I use -- I have arthritis and this is easy on my hands too

http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w8/katldog/rake.jpg

Lynda

Bluerules
08-11-2009, 01:33 PM
I use the slicker on some dogs- like my Opie that has a very thick coat. I use it on the thickest parts, around his neck and on the back of his hind legs. He has such thick hair on his back side, the boy could sit on a tack and never feel it. On the more sensitive parts, I use a regular brush or a flea comb.
the slicker worked great for me for ten plus years lol then I found that furminater thing at a car show for like $40 and I was hooked I still used the slickers for a while but then they broke and I just never bought another one lol

the posse
08-14-2009, 04:45 PM
Hi! When we are talking about grooming IMHO we need to think about coat type. It seems like the ACD has a more variable coat than any breed I've ever seen! Just in my three dogs each has a completely different coat! Amazing! As I often have foster dogs here all it seems with different coats I need something that will work on them too.

So I need a grooming tool that will get the hair out of a dog with a coat that is more like a pelt...think Chinchilla for Savannah. And one that will be gentle enough for my big red boy Roy who is basically smooth and almost slick on most of his body. But a tool that will also handle the britches and ruff hair too. The ZOOM GROOM by Kong does all this. It is easy to handle with one hand,gentle on the dog as well as the coat and Skin and gets that hair OUT.

Just my two cents. ;) The Posse

Belgrael
08-14-2009, 06:11 PM
My boys have totally different coats. Bud's is thick and lush and he moults year round so I use the shedder blade on him after a swim or bath, to get the water off and the superficial hair that has come loose and when he is dry and seems to be moulting more than usual I use the Furminator on him.

Chip's coat is closer and shorter, not think or lush at all except around his neck and butt so I use the shorter bladed side of the shedder on him when he is wet so as not to scratch his skin. I do use the Furminator on him when he is dry but very light pressure.

Both boys eat raw so the bowl is irrelevant except for when they get their vegies/cottage cheese/offal/yoghurt etc then they get it in a steel bowl that sits on the ground. They are well separated so no competition.

The goo poo is no longer an issue once you feed raw. I used to have the same problem and just did the best I could. No more goo poo.

I do have a problem still with Chip pooing in the water at the beach though. There's no faking that one. Just blush and move on while hiding your face :(:grr:

RickAKAFishslayer
08-14-2009, 08:51 PM
Just in my three dogs each has a completely different coat! Amazing!

And even on the same dog! Dingo has a pretty uniform thick lush undercoat, but the topcoat is like two different dogs. The black areas are sleek, shiny & smooth. The blue area is the more classic wiry rough stuff.

Lucy and Zorro had almost zilch undercoat. MUCH easier to get out burrs & foxtails.

Rick:paw: