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caffiend
06-02-2009, 05:13 PM
I just got my first ACD last weekend. Her name is Stella, she just turned 8 weeks old and has crazy amounts of energy. I'm trying to embed a picture, hopefully it works :).

From what I've read she's a textbook ACD, energetic, intelligent, and quite stubborn at times. I've managed to teach her basic commands, come, sit, lay down. The one thing I'm struggling with is exercise. I play with her for a couple of hours before work (she gets up around 5am and lets me know she wants out of her crate to go outside), an hour at lunch, and then from the time I get home (5.30 ish) until she goes to bed at 10.30. That should be enough time, but the exercise isn't very demanding of her, it's usually fetching a ball (but not dropping it...yet) or tug of war with a rope with training sessions mixed in.

I would really like to be able to take her on jogs with me but even walking her usually results in a standoff between us. She seems easily distracted by and curious of ... everything. Occasionally she'll walk / slowly jog with me and I praise her the whole time, but it still seems really random. It's generally me tugging her along for a bit then giving up. Anyone have any tips on how i can get her to follow me on her leash?

lauralu
06-02-2009, 05:22 PM
OMD!!! She is adorable!!! She is still young and you have done a great job to teach her so much already.

Have you thought of taking an obedience class with her? This helped a lot with my dog Pebbles that acted the same when she was on lead, I had to pull her along. At class she wanted to follow what the other dogs were doing so once she saw others walking on the lead she wanted to as well. Now she walks very nicely. Also in the beginning I used a no pull harness (the kind that has the leash attachment in the front) with her so I wouldn't choke her when I was trying to get her to stay with me.

Good luck with your cutie!!!!

lucystrauss
06-02-2009, 05:23 PM
It's actually not good to take puppies jogging with you, as it is hard on their growing joints. As for getting her to follow you on a leash, use baits. Try treats or a favourite toy, depending on what she prefers. Also, before you do that, attach the leash to her and let her drag it around to get used to the feeling of it. She is soooo cute and I'm sure you'll have lots of fun! It's VERY impressive that you've already taught an 8 wk old pup to come!

caffiend
06-02-2009, 05:32 PM
Thanks for the replies so far! If jogging isn't going to be good for her, walking it is. What age is acceptable to start jogging?

I've not looked into any obedience classes yet, but I'll definitely add that to my list of stuff to do.

As for teaching her the commands, 'come' is her shakiest, she listens about 80% of the time depending on what's going on. Specifically if there are any flowers within reach, she'll pretty much ignore me until the flower has been stomped into the ground and maybe chewed on a little. She loves pouncing flowers for some reason.. She's starting to get the hang of 'shake'.

I'll definitely try the equivalent of a carrot on a stick though. I wonder if anyone has made such an apparatus for pups :roll1:.

TexasCDLorenz
06-02-2009, 05:37 PM
Please don't jog with her- it really could damage her growing body! My obedience club has an age limit for classes- usually 4months. If she just turned 8wks- that is too early to really expect her to walk well on leash. Put a long line on her, then let her go as far as you can safely, then call her to you. Teaches the recall and gives her a good safe run (just make sure you are in a safe area) Just take it easy with her and don't make her jog or jump.

caffiend
06-02-2009, 05:44 PM
Oh don't worry. I didn't realize it would damage her joints. Knowing that, I will absolutely not jog with her :). If it's too early, it's too early, I'm fine with that. I just wasn't sure if I needed to be doing something differently or not. I just really want to make sure shes getting all the exercise she needs to get!

lucystrauss
06-02-2009, 06:24 PM
It's best to wait until her skeletal system has stopped growing, which is about 2 years for a medium-sized dog. Keep up with the training - you've got a great head start.

Oh, and we'll be expecting many more pictures :p

noworriesjake
06-02-2009, 06:25 PM
In our obedience class, we used a wooden spoon with peanut butter on it as a carrot for walking so that we weren't hunched over with some treat trying to walk a straight line.

Teaching her new tricks is a great way to wear her out besides just the walking. Since she apparently likes to pounce and kill your flowers, a fleece tug is a good thing to drag around on the floor and let her attack it. It's also something safe she can sink those sharp puppy teeth into. Her attention span is gonna be very short at this age but will improve as she gets older. An easy trick to teach her at this age is "watch me" -- it's a command to help get her attention. You can either get her attention with a treat and draw it up next to your eyes or tap your finger on your nose -- as soon as she makes eye contact she'll get the treat. Over time you can make her wait longer before getting the treat. It's one of the first things you would learn in an obedience class. It's very usual for getting her attention off something she shouldn't be focusing on and onto you.

dingoridge
06-02-2009, 06:38 PM
To have an 8 week old puppy paying attention 80% of the time is unbelievable. I had a year old that wasn't focusing 80% of the time. This is a BABY--think of a one year old child--how much focus do they have--little to none except for toys and goodies. So, give your baby time to grow up--jogging, absolutely not until the growth plates are closed--walking, yes but even that, understand this is a BABY!! Play games with her, let her frolick around the house, play at her speed in the yard, you have years of teaching her--don't sour her now on teaching her so much. She needs play time, down time, get acquainted time, time to watch the birds, try to catch the squirrels, tear up leaves in the yard, pull up grass, and yes tear up your flowers. Get her active toys, a tug is a great idea--and noworriesjake makes the best!! Let her grow into adolescence before you expect too much of her. Teaching her the very basics is fine but just play with her. Jogging comes much later--even long walks shouldn't be pushed at this point, she needs to play, nap, play, nap, learn the basics which you have taught her and nap again. Most obedience courses won't take dogs before 4 months old, they can't concentrate long enough to do well before that. Her attention span is very short right now and that's totally normal. Don't expect too much of her and you will have wonderful dog, ready to learn and to become your best friend.

She is gorgeous. And in our obedience classes, we hold a very good, very stinky treat in our hand, palm toward the dog, treat inbetween the fingers and hold the hand in front of her nose, as she comes forward you walk forward, after a few steps give the treat or allow her to lick for the treat, increase the distance and continue to give treats, that gets the idea of your walking forward is a reward, your hand has a reward and soon she will be walking by your side. As Mel said, she is so short, you may need to use a long-handled spoon to reach her nose right now. But play games with her to get her attention on you and use lots of rewards for every favorable action you get.
J

Mel2001
06-02-2009, 07:55 PM
I have a 17 yr old (son) who doesn't even pay attention 20% of the time....
:roll1:

Dominique
06-02-2009, 09:31 PM
What a cutie I love little red girls.

caffiend
06-02-2009, 11:05 PM
Thanks so much for the advice everyone, I really appreciate it! I didn't mean to come across as though I crack the whip on her learning, we spend most of her time playing with her toys, the training is just in short sessions throughout the day. I'm still working on the housebreaking so there are still accidents.

I'm glad to hear I'm doing the right things, I was worried she wasn't getting enough exercise/attention, but it sounds like I'm doing just fine :).

I'll get more pictures ASAP. She's starting to understand 'shake' now too :D.

DrArin
06-02-2009, 11:59 PM
dont get too anxious with the housebreaking thing. Monster is 4 months and still has the occasional accident.

but she seems similar to yours. Pays attention well. but with quirks. She walks BETTER off leash than on, but she (just in the last few days) has seemed to "get" the leash, and now walks very well on it. In fact, i never walked her on a leash for the first month or so. During that time she learned that she was to shadow me, no exceptions.

She has learned to stop and sit at curbs, look both ways, and then only starts again when i tell her to.

Im consistently impressed by the calm, deliberate, thoughtful manner in which she conducts herself. She is a good dog. Yours is going to be too, i can see it in her face.

3blues
06-03-2009, 12:04 AM
Sounds like you're doing a great job with her, she's adorable. Welcome to Aucado. :biggrin2:

Jake&Tex
06-03-2009, 12:11 AM
I have a 17 yr old (son) who doesn't even pay attention 20% of the time....
:roll1:

LOL!!!

Congrats on the new red girl!! She's darling! You will have many happy times with her! :paw:

dingoridge
06-03-2009, 12:12 AM
Thanks so much for the advice everyone, I really appreciate it! I didn't mean to come across as though I crack the whip on her learning, we spend most of her time playing with her toys, the training is just in short sessions throughout the day. I'm still working on the housebreaking so there are still accidents.


No, it didn't sound like that, just let her grow up a little, she needs to get a little emotional/mental maturity as well as physical before she is able to respond to training and housebreaking--kinda like a human kid, some potty train very quickly, others need time. So just take it a little at a time with her but right now she is very young and needs time to grow both in body and mind. She is going to be quite a girl--they are so smart sometimes it's hard to remember how mentally immature they are. Well, that is if you don't have one like my male--he's so smart but hasn't totally found his brain yet--but it's coming.
J

Linda Watkins
06-03-2009, 12:19 AM
--they are so smart sometimes it's hard to remember how mentally immature they are. Well, that is if you don't have one like my male--he's so smart but hasn't totally found his brain yet--but it's coming.
J

When I first got Rose, I was informed about the OBM (optional brain module) for cattle dogs, which usually isn't installed until they're about 2 years old. If you get the dog from a breeder, it is the breeder's responsibility to send the module along for installment, however, if you get a rescue, it may take awhile to track down a suitable module.:biggrin2:

I don't think Rose's is installed properly because at 8 years old she's still not mellowing, and I never did find Sam's!:naughty:

Mel2001
06-03-2009, 12:45 AM
When I first got Rose, I was informed about the OBM (optional brain module) for cattle dogs, which usually isn't installed until they're about 2 years old. If you get the dog from a breeder, it is the breeder's responsibility to send the module along for installment, however, if you get a rescue, it may take awhile to track down a suitable module.:biggrin2:

I don't think Rose's is installed properly because at 8 years old she's still not mellowing, and I never did find Sam's!:naughty:


Linda, you always have such sage words of wisdom! :biggrin2:

Reminds me of a VERY good friend of mine, who just had her daughter a little over 2 years ago. Well, my dear friend and her husband told my husband and me what their well-thought plans were in raising their daughter, and what she'd be doing by the time she's 18, etc. Knowingly, my husband looked at each other and started laughing. We told our friends to shuck all of their plans out the window, because they're raising a GIRL and she was going to do whatever the heck she wanted, lol! :naughty:

All kidding aside, though: You want to do well by your puppy (and children), but you also have to have some leeway in your goals & expectations; otherwise, you're going to be very disappointed! :)

dingoridge
06-03-2009, 06:50 AM
If you get the dog from a breeder, it is the breeder's responsibility to send the module along for installment, however, if you get a rescue, it may take awhile to track down a suitable module.:biggrin2:

I don't think Rose's is installed properly because at 8 years old she's still not mellowing, and I never did find Sam's!:naughty:

My male is a rescue, there was no OBM, no instruction book, no operator's manual, etc. He has just turned two and occasionally (that's once in about 45 days) I can see a spark and know the plug is still there for the OBM. I just hope it was insured when it was sent, I would hate to lose it completely in the mail. I would try to find a replacement OBM but his wiring is unique so I'm trying to wait until the original shows up. :biggrin2:
J

Belgrael
06-03-2009, 07:14 AM
hehehehhee
Chip never got his OBM either. I think the pet store we got him from must have sold it to someone else. Maybe somebody got a super smart lab they didn't expect :naughty:

DPinMD
06-03-2009, 08:23 AM
Wow, what a cutie! I love that sweet face!! Something that you might want to try with her is clicker training, which provides a TON of mental "exercise," and thus provides a way to tire her out without having to spend hours walking. Nick sacks out after a 20 minute clicker session as if he's just run 5 miles!

I highly recommend the book When Pigs Fly: Training Success With Impossible Dogs by Jane Killion. (I have no financial interest, I just love the book.) Nick is by no means "impossible," in fact he's very eager to learn, but I just found this book to be a great intro to the hows and whys of clicker training.

Bluerules
06-03-2009, 09:26 AM
awww!! she looks like she could be my Sydneys sister :biggrin2:

fanofdmb84
06-03-2009, 09:46 AM
I second the clicker training! I clicker trained my first dog when he was just a tiny pup and we lived in a tiny apartment. He slept better after a 20 min clicker session than an hour of playing fetch.

caffiend
06-03-2009, 11:34 AM
The clicker training sounds quite interesting. Although I have a few questions about it if anyone would like to answer them :).

Specifically it seems the idea is that you click anytime they do something good and then reward them, over time they associate the click with being good. All that makes perfect sense as that's essentially what I've been doing with commands and rewarding with treats.

The part I don't quite understand is the literature I've read (ok, scanned :a-wink:) suggests that you introduce the cues after the dog has learned the good behavior and associated it with a click. If you wait to do so, how does the dog differentiate between the good behaviors? Are you only supposed to click train one command at a time and once they've learned the 'cue' for that trick, you move on?

I've got no exposure to click training really, although now that I've read about it I've seen it used on dolphins and just had no idea what it was :).

Could anyone suggest any resources on the net I could read?

Thanks!

littleroads
06-03-2009, 11:46 AM
I've been out of the loop on clicker training for awhile, but there's a very good site - www.clickersolutions.com (http://www.clickersolutions.com).

TexasCDLorenz
06-03-2009, 12:34 PM
I've never figured out clicker training either- and I've been to seminars!
There are some videos on Marker training, which is similar, on Leerburg.com
For me, it is easier to learn something by watching it done.
www.jjdog.com - this site has a lot of training books and videos for almost anything. They have some good videos on clickers. The Leerburg site has free e-books.

DPinMD
06-03-2009, 01:24 PM
The part I don't quite understand is the literature I've read (ok, scanned :a-wink:) suggests that you introduce the cues after the dog has learned the good behavior and associated it with a click. If you wait to do so, how does the dog differentiate between the good behaviors? Are you only supposed to click train one command at a time and once they've learned the 'cue' for that trick, you move on?


I'm not sure if you "have to" do it that way (learn one behavior at a time and then move on), but that is how I do it with Nick. I'm usually practicing/reinforcing a few other (already learned) behaviors, but we just focus on one new behavior at a time. The thing that's cool about clicker training is that it becomes almost like a game for your dog, and it really makes them engage in problem-solving, which is great mental exercise. Basically, the object of the "game" is that they have to figure out what you want them to do in order to get a click and a treat. I don't know if you've ever played this, but it's similar to a game I play with my kids where there's something hidden in the room and they have to find it, and I tell them if they are getting "warmer" or "colder."

ETA: There are also a ton af clicker training videos on youtube if you want to see it in practice.

Kwakley
06-03-2009, 01:32 PM
hehehehhee
Chip never got his OBM either. I think the pet store we got him from must have sold it to someone else. Maybe somebody got a super smart lab they didn't expect :naughty:

:snicker:

Ah, poor labs....

fanofdmb84
06-03-2009, 01:46 PM
The part I don't quite understand is the literature I've read (ok, scanned :a-wink:) suggests that you introduce the cues after the dog has learned the good behavior and associated it with a click. If you wait to do so, how does the dog differentiate between the good behaviors? Are you only supposed to click train one command at a time and once they've learned the 'cue' for that trick, you move on?

I, too, only trained one behavior at a time. However, on average, it took him a whopping 7 minutes to learn a new 'trick'. I timed it. :naughty: Things I've taught using a clicker: turning on a light, putting toys in a box, sit, down, roll over, dance, shake, play dead, spin, etc etc.

I would train one behavior, and the next day I would run through all of them including the new one. The next day I'd start on a new one, and repeat the process. The great thing about not putting a word to the behavior until they are already doing it is that it gets the dog thinking and not waiting for you to make it do something. When I get out the clicker, my boy runs through all of his tricks and then makes up some cooky combinations just trying to get me to click the clicker. Where, for example, as a dog who was trained to sit by having someone shove his rear end down on the floor every time, will just stand there and wait for you to move his body for him, with a blank expression on his face. Clicker training is FUN and my dogs love to do it. It's a game to them.

Besides, imagine yourself in a foreign country where you don't speak the language. Do you think someone babbling at you, over and over and over again, is going to make any more sense the 100th time they say it? Now, if they were quiet and not obnoxiously yapping in your ear, and you, say, turn on the faucet, and they immediately give you $100. You're going to do it again, right? Well, after a few times, you've got this figured out, and they start saying one simple word every time you turn on the faucet, you're going to figure out that if they say the word, you turn on the faucet, you get the $100. Where as before, they said the word a hundred times and you still didn't know what they were saying. Even if they say the word and turn the faucet on themselves, that doesn't mean YOU should be doing it...well, it could, but that's confusing!

Kind of a long, babbling way of explaining it, but that's always how I think of it. :biggrin2:

k9blueheeler
06-04-2009, 01:10 AM
You have a very cute pupy. Being a female I wouldn't worry about the OBM issue. The females tend to have their's much sooner than the boys. I have one male that is 4 yrs. old and has some OBM. My 3 yr. old boy doesn't really have his OBM. My rescue female has had her's since I've had her at 8 months of age. I'm thinking my boys with eventually develope their OBM.

dingoridge
06-04-2009, 08:30 AM
The females tend to have their's much sooner than the boys. I have one male that is 4 yrs. old and has some OBM. My 3 yr. old boy doesn't really have his OBM. My rescue female has had her's since I've had her at 8 months of age. I'm thinking my boys with eventually develope their OBM.

:) I don't know whether it's "females vs males" or individual dogs, know there have been discussions here about "f vs m" but I have a female who didn't get her OBM until about 3 and a female 10 months old that seems to have come with hers (both rescues), and my 2 year-old male definitely doesn't have a clue yet. It's interesting to watch, frustrating (but humorous) to work with.
J

caffiend
06-04-2009, 09:28 AM
Thanks for all the advice and suggestions everyone! I brought home a clicker yesterday at lunch and worked with her some yesterday. These things are great!

It instantly helped a ton once she made the click -> treat association as now she will pay attention for much longer periods of time (10 minutes instead of 3 :naughty:).

Boofer69
06-04-2009, 11:18 AM
From what I've read she's a textbook ACD, energetic, intelligent, and quite stubborn at times. have any tips on how i can get her to follow me on her leash?

Yep, textbook ACD ( Female ).....very stubborn :biggrin2:

Very intelligent, ( too much for her own good.) :s11:

Just jokes. With Brandi we just walked her. When she was big enough she just did tha thang , we put her collar and leash on and away she went.

CrazyCatlady
06-05-2009, 11:37 PM
She is so cute! Congrats. Sounds like she is getting plenty of attention. You will get lots of great training tips here.